A man had seizures after consuming hot pot turns out to a tapeworm in his brain

A man had seizures after consuming hot pot turns out to a tapeworm in his brain

A 46-year old construction employee in China suffering from seizures turned out to have tapeworms in his brain. It is considered to be the result of eating undercooked meat. According to a report that was published last week, about a month ago, Zhu, from Luzhou, in the eastern Zhejiang region, bought pork and mutton to cook in a spicy hot pot broth. After a few days, he started to feel dizzy and endured headaches during the day. During the night, while he was sleeping, Zhu would face seizure-like symptoms that are similar to epilepsy. Zhu’s coworkers got him during such a seizure and promptly sent him to a nearby hospital, where a CT scan showed intracranial calculations and injury in his skull. However, Zhu refused any further examinations, not absenting from spending more money, and returned home.

These symptoms did not go away, and Zhu continued realizing seizures. Finally, he went to the Zhejiang University hospital, where doctors performed an MRI scan and diagnosed him with neurocysticercosis, which includes tapeworms on the brain. After knowing that Zhu had consumed hot pot recently, the hospital’s chief physician discussed that the pork and mutton might have been displaced by tapeworm larvae that could have entered Zhu’s digestive tract as the meat was not cooked properly. In the report, Zhu stated that he only simmered the meat a little. After doctors have dispelled the tapeworms and reduced the pressure on Zhu’s brain, since that time, he has recovered.

Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic transit that is contracted when someone swallows tapeworm eggs that have passed in the feces of another person who has an internal tapeworm. The larvae creep out of the eggs and into muscles and brain tissues, where they form cysts like the calcifications that were observed in Zhu’s CT scan. Cysticercosis infections happen worldwide, though these parasitic incursions of the human body mostly arrive in rural areas of the country where pigs are allowed to roam and where sanitation practices are not developed.